One Book One Bronx
at Casita Maria

One Book One Bronx is a new style book club that inspires, encourages, and delights readers. In September 2019 and January 2020, join us at Casita Maria Center for Arts & Education when we will meet to discuss books that reflect on the artwork featured in the Gallery. These restorative conversations are related to women, migration and culture. It’s free to join, and free books will be given to the first 15 participants.

GIRL IN THE MIRROR: THREE GENERATIONS OF BLACK WOMEN IN MOTION BY NATASHA TARPLEY

Meeting Location
Casita Maria Center for Arts & Education
928 Simpson St. 6th Fl. Gallery, Bronx, NY 10459

Dates
Wednesdays, 6:30pm to 8:00pm
September 11, 18, 25, October 2, & 9
, 2019
>> CLICK HERE TO RSVP

From runaway slaves to the Great Migration, black people have uprooted themselves in search of a better life. Yet migration has also meant loss: rootlessness, separation from family, disconnection from ancestors and the past. In this family memoir told in the voices of three generations, poet Natasha Tarpley sets her own migrations in the context of a long line of Americans narratives. Both historical and personal, Girl in the Mirror traces her grandparents’ movements from Alabama to Chicago, her mother’s move to Boston after her father’s death, and her own trip to Africa and back. Tarpley emerges at the end reflected in the lives, struggles, and loves of those black people who have traveled the road before her.

EXHIBITION INFO


SEARCHING FOR ZION: THE QUEST FOR HOME IN THE AFRICAN DIASPORA BY EMILY RABOTEAU

Meeting Location
Casita Maria Center for Arts & Education
928 Simpson St. 6th Fl. Gallery, Bronx, NY 10459

Dates
Wednesdays, 6:30pm to 8:00pm
January 8, 15, 22, 29, & February 5, 2020

>> CLICK HERE TO RSVP

A decade in the making, Emily Raboteau’s Searching for Zion takes readers around the world on an unexpected adventure of faith. Both one woman’s quest for a place to call “home” and an investigation into a people’s search for the Promised Land, this landmark work of creative nonfiction is a trenchant inquiry into contemporary and historical ethnic displacement.

On her ten-year journey back in time and around the globe, through the Bush years and into the age of Obama, Raboteau wanders to Jamaica, Ethiopia, Ghana, and the American South to explore the complex and contradictory perspectives of Black Zionists. She talks to Rastafarians and African Hebrew Israelites, Evangelicals and Ethiopian Jews, and Katrina transplants from her own family–people that have risked everything in search of territory that is hard to define and harder to inhabit. Uniting memoir with historical and cultural investigation, Raboteau overturns our ideas of place and patriotism, displacement and dispossession, citizenship and country in a disarmingly honest and refreshingly brave take on the pull of the story of Exodus.

EXHIBITION INFO